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Trudeau didn't just defend the niqab. He defended the niqab by trivializing the Holocaust

When a politician says, "I am not a crook," he does so because many people have reasonable doubts to the contrary. Likewise, when a politician prefaces a political speech with a long and emphatic denial that he's pandering to a "key audience" or "swing voters" - well, brace yourself for pandering delivered in a large, family-sized container.

That's how to understand Justin Trudeau's attention-grabbing speech in Toronto last week. The speech was built to deliver a message astutely aimed at exactly the kind of "key audience" that Trudeau insisted he never, ever, ever thinks about: "We should all shudder to hear the same rhetoric that led to a 'none is too many' immigration policy toward Jews in the '30s and '40s, being used to raise fears against Muslims today."

In case any TV crew missed the soundbite, Trudeau reprised it later in his speech: "This is not the spirit of Canadian liberty, my friends. It is the spirit of the Komagata Maru. Of the St. Louis. Of 'none is too many.'"

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