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Freedom of Speech

Franklin Graham: Same-Sex Marriage Cost Canada Its Freedoms; Expect the Same in the US

Freedom of speech, press, and religion "have suffered greatly" in Canada since it began federally mandating same-sex marriage in 2005, the Rev. Franklin Graham warns even as the U.S. Supreme Court is considering its legalization.

"[In Canada] If you say or write anything questioning same-sex marriage, you could face discipline, termination of employment, or prosecution by the government!" Graham, who leads the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, wrote on his Facebook page on Friday.

"We need to realize that if our Supreme Court makes same-sex marriage the law in the United States, we will be in the same boat," he added, asking, "Will the next step be to ban us from speaking God's truth from His Word about this issue?"

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White students barred from meeting at Ryerson University because they were not 'racialized'

A round of public furor has centered on Toronto's Ryerson University after two journalism students were barred from an on-campus meeting because they were not "racialized."

First-year journalism students Julia Knope and Trevor Hewitt were attempting to attend a meeting hosted by the Racialised Students' Collective when they were asked to leave by a group organizer.

"She asked them if they had been marginalized or racialized, and when they both responded 'no,' that's when she said the meeting was only for those who felt they had been," said Anne McNeilly, an associate professor at the Ryerson School of Journalism.

Ms. Knope and Mr. Hewitt, who are both visibly white, had been attempting to attend the gathering as part of a assignment by Ms. McNeilly to sit in on a public meeting.

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Free speech wins... for now

For now at least, we do have freedom of speech in Canada.

But try booking a conference room to protest the bizarre anti-Islamic blasphemy motion. Organizers of the Emergency Rally for Free Speech found out first-hand Tuesday freedom is not always free - even when you are prepared to pay.

The rally was scheduled for Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. at a Toronto hotel and with up to 1,000 people expected, including up to six Conservative Party leadership candidates, organizers were gearing up to send a message as parliament gets set to debate M-103 this week.

Until the phone rang with some strange news.

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British Columbia court denies Charter rights to pro-lifers on campus

In a stunning reversal of recent rulings in nearby provinces, British Columbia Chief Justice Christopher Hinkson has ruled that Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms does not apply to pro-life students seeking space on the University of Victoria campus to demonstrate.

Former U Vic student Cameron Cote and the B.C. Civil Liberties Association had petitioned for a declaration that the university administration had breached the Youth Protecting Youth pro-life club's Charter rights when, in early 2013, it refused permission to display pictures of aborted and healthy babies.

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Judge approves 'Killing Jews' posters on New York subways and buses paid for by pro-Israel group

New Yorkers are used to aggressive advertising. Banners for breast implants. Billboards for condoms. But a federal judge's ruling has opened the door for far more controversial posters on buses and subways across the city.

"Killing Jews is Worship that draws us close to Allah," reads one such ad next to the image of a young man in a checkered headscarf. "That's His Jihad. What’s yours?"

The poster is at the center of heated legal debate over public safety and free speech. On Tuesday, U.S. District Judge John Koeltl ruled that New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority cannot stop the controversial ad from running on scores of subway cars and buses.

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