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Freedom of Speech

Former B.C. premier rips Wynne over 'racism' comments

At a policy conference in Ottawa last week, Premier Kathleen Wynne and Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard commented on aggression and backlash against Canadian Muslims following the deadly terrorist attacks in Paris that claimed 130 lives.

Wynne warned that security concerns over federal Liberal plans to allow 25,000 Syrian refugees into Canada by Jan. 1 cannot become a "mask" for racism. "That's the danger and that somehow talking about security allows us to tap into that racist vein, when that isn't who we are," Wynne said.

Couillard added, "We have those two devils within our society: racism and xenophobia. They exist."

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Ben Carson dissects media bias with surgical precision

It should surprise no one that a neurosurgeon knows how to get inside people's heads. But Dr. Ben Carson executed a first-rate act of mental judo on the mainstream media last week - and one exchange deserves the attention of all pro-life and pro-family speakers who must go on television.

The controversy began Friday morning, when Politico ran a story entitled: "EXCLUSIVE: Ben Carson admits fabricating West Point scholarship." It came after questions arose about other, minor aspects of his biography - scrutiny that coincidentally coincided with his status as a front runner in some 2016 polls.

The details of the controversy are here, but in brief: The story claimed that Carson was forced to admit that he never applied for, and was never formally offered, a "full scholarship" to West Point, an alleged pillar of his life story. But Carson never said that he applied to West Point, only that as an ROTC officer, someone suggested Carson could be appointed to the military academy (where all scholarships are "full scholarships").

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Quebec wants to uncover faces while it covers mouths

Over the years I've written many columns about honour killings in Canada's South Asian communities. Under the terms of Quebec's proposed Bill 59, my frequent allusion to the demonstrable fact that most victims of honour crimes are Muslim girls and women might, posted on the Internet as all my published writing is, lead to prosecution for Islamophobia with a possible fine of $20,000, and my name posted to an online list of offenders in perpetuity. Would that stop me from criticizing the cultural roots of honour crimes? Yup, it sure would.

Such a lawsuit could be initiated by any individual who feels offended by a statement that he or she believes promotes "fear of the other." The fact that what I have written is "true" and "in the public interest" would not be grounds for my defence, as they are under the actual laws of defamation.

This bombshell makes a mockery of the federal government's 2013 move to end scrutiny of Internet speech in abolishing Section 13 of the Human Rights Act. Most worrisome, if made law, the bill would allow the Quebec Human Rights Commission (QHRC) to pursue websites it deems disrespectful to Islam.

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This protester has served 10 years and seven months in jail and no one cares

At 11:02 Wednesday morning, Linda Gibbons sat uncomfortably, hands cuffed behind her back, in the rear seat of a Toronto Police squad car.

She was taken first to 53 Division, transferred to 55 Division where all women are held overnight pending their first court appearance, and is expected to be paraded for a show-cause hearing Thursday morning.

She is an unrepentant recidivist, a hopeless repeat offender.

She is a serious criminal.

Gibbons doesn't count her arrests, but probably she's been in the back seat of squad cars a couple of dozen times in the past two decades - and that's including the five years she took off to care for her dying father.

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Judge bans sidewalk counseling outside Montreal abortion facilities indefinitely

A Quebec judge who pro-lifers say showed her bias against them throughout oral arguments surprised nobody by indefinitely perpetuating an injunction against pro-life street counsellors and by tripling the distance they must keep away from two downtown Montreal abortion facilities.

"Except for the Providence of God," George Buscemi, the head of Campaigne Quebec-Vie, told LifeSiteNews, “it is very difficult to see any good in this.” The pro-life group plans to argue the issue at least one more time at a hearing on the permanent injunction the clinics have applied for.

According to those who attended the oral hearing several months ago, Judge Chantal Lamarche demonstrated her preference for the arguments from the two clinics, Femina and Morgentaler, "in a thousand details" and "body language."

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